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How IKO shingle dimensions provide an advantage

Compare the sizes and advantages of every asphalt roofing shingle IKO produces



This is a Sponsored Post from IKO

Once upon a time, traditional strip or 3-tab shingle dimensions, as well as asphalt shingle dimensions, measured 12 inches wide by 36 inches long. These are still considered standard asphalt shingle dimensions.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

IKO was among the first manufacturers to introduce the “metric-size” roofing shingle, defined as being 13-1/4 inches long by 39-3/8 inches wide. Admittedly, it’s rather confusing to call a shingle “metric” and then proceed to define it in Imperial measure; however, 39-3/8 inches is the equivalent of one meter.

This increase in size provided greater coverage and exposure. It’s estimated that the larger size allowed installers to lay a roof up to 10 percent faster than with the smaller standard-sized shingle, providing a considerable time and labor-saving advantage.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Below is a handy chart to check IKO shingle dimensions at a glance.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Today, the dimensions of architectural shingles may vary from one manufacturer to another for several reasons, such as the physical limitations of the laminators, the dimensions of the fiberglass mat used (especially if the manufacturer makes its own as IKO does), the profile, cut and shape of the individual shingles or simply to create a point of competitive differentiation.

IKO offers four different categories of quality asphalt shingles: Premium, Performance, Architectural and Traditional (3-tab) Collections. The size and exposure of the shingles within each Collection vary, as shown in the chart above.

For example, IKO MarathonTM and IKO MarathonTM Plus AR belong to the Traditional Collection of 3-tab shingles and possess those standard metric shingles dimensions.

We hope you’ve found these explanations and this comparison chart useful.

Did you know that IKO shingles provide a significant “time and materials” advantage to you as a contractor? Watch the following video to learn more.