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VIDEO: Interview with PROBUILT's Mike Upshall: How to structure your renovation firm

Mike Upshall, a veteran homebuilder and renovator, talks about how he runs his firm using a lead carpenter system that puts on-the-tools carpenters into front line roles with full budgetary responsibilities


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March 18, 2014 by Robert Koci

If you have some questions of how you should structure your company to be flexible enough to grow with the coming improvement in the economy, you’ll find some ideas in this video. Watch the video here.

Mike Upshall of design-build firm PROBUILT, Toronto, interviewed by Rob Koci, was on the cover of the first-ever issue of Canadian Contractor in 2000.

In his own words, he’s gone “from master carpenter to businessman.”

What’s the difference? A world of difference, and explaining what an a true entrepreneurial renovator will need to do to structure his or her business is the point of this 6 minute video clip.

Upshall’s firm, ProBuilt, runs with a “lead carpenter system.” ProBuilt’s lead carpenters are both on the tools AND have supervisory responsibilities. In fact, they have more than that. They have total budgetary responsibilities and are the first point of contact for clients, Mike says.

“How much do you have to pay someone to do a job like that?” Rob asks.

“A lot. And they’re worth every nickel,” Mike replies.


Robert Koci

Robert Koci

Rob Koci is the publisher of Canadian Contractor magazine. rkoci@canadiancontractor.ca Tel. 647-407-0754
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1 Comment » for VIDEO: Interview with PROBUILT's Mike Upshall: How to structure your renovation firm
  1. I really enjoyed the video interview.
    Same business model I’ve been using for years and it sure is nice to hear from someone else that it works for them too.
    When listening to Mike talk about 3 to 4 million per year gross it helps me understand better that maybe what I’ve been doing is successful. I guess I just didn’t know it.
    The bad news? I am unable and unwilling to work the 14 plus hour days anymore so I am forced into better and stronger delegating. I am forced into thinking instead of sweating. I am forced into leaving it all at the office at the end of the day. Why did I not do that years ago??? This sure feels good. Rewarding too.

    Thanks Rob. Keep up the good work.

    David