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Site Tips Episode 12 (VIDEO): How to use a tape measure and/or steel ruler as a calculator

Canadian Contractor Site Tips are brought to you by Home Hardware


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December 14, 2018 by canadiancontractor

Especially with imperial measurements, it’s tough to divide odd numbers accurately on the job site, without a calculator or a scratch pad.

Suppose you need to divide a length in half – and it’s something like 25′-13/16″. Can you do that quickly? Probably not.

Rob Koci shows you how a humble tape measure can do the math for you, in about 30 seconds.

How about dividing an odd width by 3? Or 5?

Rob shows you how a steel rule can also be used as a calculator, no matter what your measurements.

And finally, how about those tricky “inside to inside” measurements? Bending a steel tape measure on the inside of a door or window frame and “guessing” the width is not the best method for a totally accurate reading.

Rob shows you a neat trick for deadly accurate inside-to-inside measuring.

Canadian Contractor Site Tips are brought to you by Home Hardware.

ANSWER THIS QUESTION AND YOU COULD WIN A $50 GAS CARD IF WE PUBLISH YOUR CORRECT ANSWER!

WHY ARE SO MANY STEEL TAPE MEASURES YELLOW AS A BACKGROUND COLOUR?

(No, it’s NOT that they are made by DEWALT, although they DO make fine yellow tape measures!)


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Canadian Contractor is the independent voice of residential renovators and home builders everywhere in Canada.
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1 Comment » for Site Tips Episode 12 (VIDEO): How to use a tape measure and/or steel ruler as a calculator
  1. Helene Kommel says:

    Half of 25 feet is 12½ feet. Half of 13/16 is 13/32. So the answer is 12 feet, 6 and 13/32 inches. Sure took a lot longer to type than to solve! Not to mention not needing a tape measure, steel rule or any other device.

    I think most folk know that half of 25 is 12½. If you need a couple of quick ways to find half of 25, let me know. The more interesting mental math is dividing in half a fraction like 13/16. Many folks will instinctively think of halving the 13. It’s so much easier to double the 16!