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HVAC contractor told he has to provide his receipts for all the parts he has used in the past, to get paid on his current job

Richard Matthew says he is being threatened with non-payment unless he can provide all of his historic parts receipts. Comments?


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October 17, 2018 by canadiancontractor

Anyone want to comment on this?

At first glance, it’s a contract issue. A customer can ask just about anything that you contractually agree to. Making up the rules AFTER the fact seems to be out of bounds, though. Comments?

I just want to ask contractors for their comments on my situation. I am an HVAC contractor. I have one particular customer who, every time they asked me to fix something for them, I have had to quote him the price of the parts. I have done that, then put markups on the parts, and they have always agreed on the prices. NOW they say they don’t want to pay me unless I give them all of the receipts for all the parts I have replaced in the past! What should I do? Thanks for your advice!

Richard


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8 Comments » for HVAC contractor told he has to provide his receipts for all the parts he has used in the past, to get paid on his current job
  1. Frank Hendsbee says:

    Advise that wholesale pricing is considered confidential (which it mostly is ), and only a retail price will be discussed.

  2. Wow sounds like a nickel and dime customer I would kindly say I can give all receipts but when I do there is no warranty. See how they react. If you provided a solid price before job was done as a contractor that is the price they should not be able to go back on previous pricing nor current ones if it’s a fixed price. Would not be a client any further of mine if that were me.

  3. Ry A says:

    Wow sounds like a nickel and dime customer I would kindly say I can give all receipts but when I do there is no warranty. See how they react. If you provided a solid price before job was done as a contractor that is the price they should not be able to go back on previous pricing nor current ones if it’s a fixed price. If they want to do it as time and material figure out the hourly rate and mark ups and show it to them that way….dont forget your overhead profit and expenses factored in. Would not be a client any further of mine if that were me.

  4. WAYNE NEWMARCH says:

    don’t work for them any more

  5. Adrian Bynoe says:

    Tell them to come to your office and present them with all your bills, so they can check for themselves. Or ask them to cover your cost (payment up front) for you to comply with their request. The ball is back in their court. Also note to self, money upfront before working for them again !!

  6. Tom DalBarco says:

    Why would you show or tell your customer the wholesale value of a part you buy from a manufacturer or wholesaler. If they had to buy it they would be paying list price. The price that you put on YOUR invoice to the customer if they have accepted it is the only price that they should be concerned with. Tell them to check their records, or send them copies of YOUR previous invoices. Everyone is entitled to put a markup on items they are selling. You should never have told them what you pay for an item. It’s on you. You should have told them you can’t work for them.

  7. Marten says:

    Don’t do it, price laid is price paid, period. Don’t like it,go somewhere else.

  8. harry veenstra says:

    I’ve told clients that I buy in bulk for many items and also in job lots
    job lots could be many items together so its next to impossible to show them an individual cost
    bulk buys are grouped with other items so again hard to show them a cost
    unless this client is a big part of my business I would consider dropping them
    if you quoted the job it should not matter what you paid for anything but if its a T&M job break down the bill to the last couple cents
    parts-labour-insurances-truck cost-overhead cost
    management cost–the list can go on and on