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New generation of residential trades doesn’t want to do the grunt work, he argues

Tim Wills finds it hard to located good young people with which to share his 17 years of residential construction knowledge


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June 1, 2018 by canadiancontractor

Another post on hiring young, new workers…

I agree it is hard to find good young people to teach and share my 17 years of residential building knowledge. But I also find that the newer generation is not as willing to do the “grunt or greenhorn” work. They expect to be up the work ladder right away. They don’t want to stick out the beginning stages of lugging, cleaning, driving nails. Plus they don’t seem to take the extra steps to show they want to learn more. I guess I am trying to say I don’t see the “work ethic” with this generation as I showed and saw in others 17 years ago. They don’t want to work hard to get ahead. They just expect to get things handed to them. Here’s an example: I now have a company truck. But first, for years, I drove around in my own vehicle for work. I never complained and for that I got rewarded with company wheels. I hear it all the time now: complaining about having to drive 30-45 minutes to get to work!

Tim Wills


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Canadian Contractor is the independent voice of residential renovators and home builders everywhere in Canada.
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1 Comment » for New generation of residential trades doesn’t want to do the grunt work, he argues
  1. Alex Goorskhee says:

    Is there a disconnect somewhere? Few years ago I decided to change careers from driving a truck to something new. Because throughout my life I always built things (such sheds, utility trailers) and also enjoyed repairing I though trades would be more suitable to an academic endeavor. So I set to enquire about a possible new career in the trades. No contractor would give me the time of the day. Well, I thought that I may not have much to offer and the folks are busy. So I decided to go to school, learn something, show my desire and have at least something to show dedication. I obtained an advanced trade diploma and two years after I am starting to doubt the wisdom of getting an education. While my field of studies was electrical I was (still am) willing to take something else on, as long as I learn and progress. I am not afraid of putting in the hours, sweat, work in the cold or rain but somehow I get the sense that having never used a worm drive saw demonstrates my inability to do carpentry.