Canadian Contractor

"Aging in place" a new buzzword for accessibility renos


September 17, 2012
By Steve Payne
Steve Payne

The most recent issue of Canadian Contractor featured a cover story about “accessibility renovations,” and how the mobility needs of seniors and the disabled is creating a big opportunity for contractors to become specialists in the field.

Well, it seems as if “accessibility” isn’t the only buzzword of the day when it comes to this type of work. How about “aging in place”?  It’s showing up in more and more in the media. And if you are in the business of building wheelchair ramps, providing accessible bathrooms and kitchens, etc., you are likely to run into this term.

Here’s an example from a recent Toronto Star story about accessibility renovations:

“The number of seniors requiring assistance is expected to double in the next 30 years, and some 10 million existing homes will need accessibility updating if those Canadians are to age in place.”

The story went on to quote Peter Simpson, president and CEO of the Greater Vancouver Home Builders’ Association, who referred to a new designation, CAPS (certified aging in place specialist), for home remodellers.

“The renovator will counsel the owner on what can be done to make the home more accessible, meeting not only their current needs but also their needs in the future,” Simpson told the Star reporter.

 


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6 Comments » for "Aging in place" a new buzzword for accessibility renos
  1. Bob and Sue says:

    My Husband and i would like to live out the rest of our lives in our home…we are both in our late 60’s,but the home needs work done to it………would like info on would could be done,
    thank you: Bob and Sue

    • Hi Tamar, I just came across your inquiry and I am not sure as to where you live. In British Columbia there is a program backed by the Provincial and Federal Government to help seniors or those with disabilities to remain in the comfort of their home longer and safer.
      The BC Housing Home Adaptation for Independence HAFI program.
      If you qualify or are eligible for this program, you can receive a grant up to $20,000. The only stipulation is you remain in your home for 3 years and therefore do not have to pay it back. If you live in another province, you might be able to contact the provincial government and ask if there is such a program there. You mentioned also that you are disabled. Through the Federal government of Canada you can apply for a Disability Tax Credit which will reduce federal taxes you pay. Canada Revenue will go back 10 years and refund any over paid taxes once this DTC T2201 is in place.

  2. Tamar says:

    I am a new senior, live my home but recently became disabled.
    I can no longer live in my home as it is now.
    I want to know what can to make my accessible for me. {open concept easy to manouver etc}to enable me to continue to here
    thanks in advance
    hoping to hear from you.
    Tamar Sivkin

  3. Robert Sexsmith says:

    Need information on the means test for Age-In-Place but after couple of hours on web pages have not found it. Not all seniors have the funds to help themselves financially, nor do they understand what they have to repay or pay to get funds to live out them life in the home they have.

  4. Anne Tyrkalo says:

    . I am 82 and living in my home a half a duplex
    at present, I have a wood fireplace that kept my house
    fairly warm. but not sufficient to be comfortable.
    I had a chimney fire and the fire dept has asked me not
    to use the fire place. so I have 2 electric heaters keeping this place warm. Which is a very expensive . I can get the gas line to my home, but I really cannot afford a furnace. My
    windows are also very drafty. I have done a lot of work on
    my home and can no longer afford to do this myself.
    Is there any help I can get?

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