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Permits down in June as West slows

Alberta and B.C. slows


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August 7, 2012 by Robert Koci

The total value of building permits fell 2.5% to $6.8 billion in June, following a 7.1% increase in May. The decline was largely the result of a decrease in the non-residential and residential sectors in Alberta and British Columbia.

Overall, construction intentions for single-family dwellings rose 4.2% to $2.4 billion, a second consecutive monthly increase. The advance was attributable to higher construction intentions in five provinces, led by Ontario.

Municipalities issued $1.9 billion worth of building permits for multi-family dwellings in June, 4.2% more than in May. The increase was largely the result of higher construction intentions in five provinces. Ontario posted the largest gain, well ahead of Quebec and Manitoba.

Nationally, municipalities approved the construction of 19,605 new dwellings, up 4.1% from May. The increase came from both single-family dwellings, which rose 5.1% to 7,316 units, and multi-family dwellings, which increased 3.6% to 12,289 units.

Declines in most provinces

The total value of building permits was down in seven provinces in June, with Alberta and British Columbia posting the largest declines.

Alberta’s decreases stemmed from lower construction intentions in both the residential and non-residential sectors. In British Columbia, the decline resulted from lower construction intentions for institutional and commercial buildings and for multi-family dwellings.

Ontario had the largest monthly increase, a result of growth in the value of building permits for residential and non-residential construction.

Permits value down in most census metropolitan areas

The total value of permits declined in 22 of the 34 census metropolitan areas.

Vancouver, Calgary and Edmonton experienced the largest declines. In Vancouver, the decrease was primarily attributable to construction intentions for institutional buildings and, to a lesser extent, multi-family dwellings, which had recorded large increases in May. In Calgary, the decrease resulted from lower construction intentions for multi-family dwellings and institutional and commercial buildings. The decline observed in Edmonton was mainly attributable to lower construction intentions for institutional buildings and single-family dwellings.

Toronto posted the largest advance, a result of increases in construction permits for residential buildings, mainly semi-detached houses, row houses and single homes, and, to a lesser extent, for non-residential buildings.


Robert Koci

Robert Koci

Rob Koci is the publisher of Canadian Contractor magazine. rkoci@canadiancontractor.ca Tel. 647-407-0754
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